Bayard, Duval County
Florida
Bayard.(Florida Times Union Feb 21, 1885)
This is a growing town on the Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Railway, fifteen miles south of Jacksonville. It
lies on a beautiful high ridge. The land is of excellent quality, suited in the cultivation of fruit and vegetables. Lying right
between the Gulf Stream in the Atlantic and St. Johns river, both warm streams of water, the climate is never as cold as
places further south in the mainland of Florida.

Fifty orange groves, in a flourishing condition, are located within a radius of five miles of Bayard. We have two local
markets at our doors,
Jacksonville and St. Augustine, in case parties do not care to ship their oranges and garden truck
to the North. We sell only to actual settlers and to those who improve. For those who cannot come in person to
superintend it we will attend to clearing land, planting out orange groves and building houses.

Lots of half an acre $50 and upwards.

We are commissioners for the sale of the railroad lands belonging to the Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River
Railway Company,

Wright & McClure
Jacksonville, Fla.

Office at Newnan Street Wharf,
P. S. -- All communications addressed to us shall receive prompt attention.

Note the date on the
Florida Times Union article above for to compare the naming. Another more probable candidate for
the name is Bayard Clinch the son of Duncan Lamont Clinch of Seminole War fame. Given that Bayard existed before
Flager the odds are against the WPA version below.

Bayard (Florida: A guide to the Southern-Most State, 1938)
Bayard, 17.9 m., (25 alt. 225 pop.), was named by
Henry M. Flagler, builder of the Florida East Coast Railway, for his
friend, Thomas F. Bayard, Ambassador to Great Britain (1893-97), the first American of that rank at the Court of St.
James's.

South of Bayard, the route closely parallels the Florida East Coast tracks. Section houses, depots, and other railroad
buildings are painted bright yellow with green trim. Blue iris, sacred to the Indians who used its roots for medicine, colors
the marshes in spring. On higher ground grows the grenadilla, or passion flower, so called by Spanish missionaries to
whom it symbolized the Passion of Christ. In the center of the blossom is a cross; the five stamens represent the five
wounds of Christ, and the 72 filaments, the traditional number of thorns in His crown. Commonly known as maypop, the
flower is a native of America; its succulent and edible fruit, large as a hen's egg, is highly perfumed.

                                                                Where to Stay in Bayard - 1912
Wings
- Mrs Wings rates per day, $1.50, per week $6.00.
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Wings Hotel 1901
Bayard African American School
Eartha White Collection, UNF
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