St. Augustine in the Civil War
Page 5
1861-1865
ab urbe condita - 296 to 300
Arrival of Yankee Prisoners (Savannah Republican Jan 19, 1863)
Eight Yankee prisoners who were taken within four miles of St. Augustine, between the Jacksonville and
Picolata Roads, a few days ago, by Captain Dixon’s company of cavalry, arrived by the Gulf road on
Saturday evening last, under charge of Capt. S. W. Mays, and were taken over to Charleston yesterday, to
be turned over to Gen. Beauregard. They were on their way to attend a sugar boiling in the vicinity of St.
Augustine, and were mounted on very valuable horses when they were surprised. The following is a list of
their names:

Lt. Virgil U. Cate, 7th New Hampshire Regiment.
Private Ossian F. French, 7th New Hampshire Regiment.
C. C. Reniey, Sutler’s Clerk, 7th New Hampshire Regiment.
Samuel T. Reddell, Sutler, 7th New Hampshire Regiment.
Ephraim Pettgell, Deserter, 7th New Hampshire Regiment.
Horace M. Prescott, Deserter, 7th New Hampshire Regiment.
Charles Russell, U. S. Mail carrier.
John Creigan, U. S. Mail carrier.

We learn through them that the Yankees are shipping negroes from St. Augustine to attach them to the
black regiments at Port Royal.

Lieut. Cate says he is in for the war for the Union and the flag, but is opposed to Lincoln’s emancipation
proclamation, and that the same feeling and views are general among the U. S. officers at St. Augustine.

The deserters above mentioned say that many of the troops would also desert, but are taught to believe
that our troops are starving and living on parched corn.

Removal (The southerner. volume, February 28, 1863)
On Saturday morning, January 31st, the citizens of St. Augustine discovered the following notice posted up
in several public places in their city:

Notice.
Headquarters 7th N. H. Volunteers,
St. Augustine, Fla, Jan. 30, 1863.

The following extract from Orders is published for the information of all concerned:
Headquarters, Dep't of the South,
Hilton Head, Port Royal, S. C.,
January 27, 1863.

Col. Putman, Commanding St. Augustine, Florida:
Colonel---You will immediately send to this Post the families (white) of all persons who have husbands,
brothers or sons in Rebel employments, and all other persons, who have at any time, declined to take the
oath of allegiance, or who have uttered a single disloyal word, in order that they may all be placed within
the Rebel lines; all those families and persons to be sent up in the steamer on which this order is sent, (the
Boston.)

By command of Maj Gen. D. Hunter.
Chas L. Halpia, Adjt
Asst Adj Gen. 10th Army Corps.
The persons mentioned in the above order will immediately hold themselves in readiness to leave at 7 A.M.
on Monday next.
By order of Col. Putman.
H. G. Webber, Adj't

Capt. John C. Anderson, Provost Marshall, who is charged with the execution of this order, will be at
"Papy's Hotel," between the hours of 10 and 12 A.M., till the departure of the boat, to be consulted by all
that desire to see him.

These unfortunate exiles have arrived in Lake city, where they were met at the railroad depot by the
citizens of the place, and kindly cared for.

The St. Augustine Exiles (Memphis daily appeal, Memphis, Tenn., February 19, 1863)
We chronicled, some days ago, the banishment of a number of families from St. Augustine for the crime
of having near male relatives in the Confederate army. The party, numbering eighty-five women and
children, were landed at Clark's place, opposite
Fernandina, not at Jacksonville as here before stated, and
told to shift for themselves. Through a cold rain they made their way on foot across the country, ten miles,
to the railroad, where transportation was furnished them to Lake City. Amid those, the kind citizens of
the place rendered them every comfort at their command. The "male sympathizers with the rebellion," they
were informed, would be sent on to Hilton head. This outrage on unoffending women and children was
perpetrated by the 7th Connecticut regiment, Col. Hawiey, who have succeeded the9th New Hampshire.
They profess to be acting under instructions from headquarters. ---
Savannah Republican, 10th.

A Provost Marshall Report on Dr. Hiems and Stephen Bacon
Headquarters Provost Marshall General
Department of the South
Port Royal April 11th 1863

Col Jas F Hall
Provost Marshall General Dept of the South

Colonel
Surgeon Snow reports to me that Dr Hiems and Mr. Stephen Bacon, two very old men brought here from St
Augustine under an order of
General Hunter that all persons who had relatives in the rebel army and who
would not take the oath of allegiance should be sent beyond the lines.  It appears that the Commandant at
St. Augustine, after these men were placed on board the US transport to be sent to
Jacksonville assumed
to send them here.

Surgeon Snow assures me that these men are old and that they are both declining in health and that
although they are rebels, yet they can do no harm if sent away, and will probably die if detained here. They
desire to be sent back to St. Augustine. Dr Hiems has a son in the rebel army. He claims to reside in
Virginia.

At the solicitation of Dr Snow, I apply to you for instructions in the premises. Mr. Gladding is still very ill.
The surgeon entertains serious apprehensions as to his recovery. General Hickman assumed command
here this morning. Do you not need the troops recently returned? I cannot see the necessity for them here.
The news from N C is quite unfavorable. It is reported that General Foster is surrounded by the enemy,
batteries in his rear. Your family is quite well. Everything in your department goes on smoothly. I forward
you several copies of your Genl Ord  Perhaps you may need them for distribution. We are in anxious
suspense concerning option. We are in anxious suspense concerning operations of the army and navy. If
the navy should fail you must engineer them out of Charleston.

I have the honor to be
Your Obedient Servant
Geo S Batcheller
Lt Col 115th N Y Vols A Dep
Provost Marshall Genl
Dept of the South

Letter from a Soldier in Florida (The Daily Green Mountain freeman, Montpelier, Vt., April 21, 1863,
Evening Edition)
Effects of Slavery in that State - His Opinion of Negro Soldiers, &c. We are permitted to make the following
interesting extracts from a private letter received by a lady of this place from a soldier In the Union army,
dated. "St. Augustine, Fla,  Feb. 21, 1863.

The weather is beginning to be quite warm. The leaves and grass are starting anew, and the peach trees
are in bloom, so I suppose spring has opened without seemingly having any winter.

''Everything in St. Augustine is quiet, although we have had some rather exciting times here. An order
came a few weeks ago, that every white person here, who had a father, son, husband or brother in the
rebel army, or any one who refused to take the oath of allegiance, should be carried to
Fernandina or
Hilton Head and be set across the lines, so that the rebels would have a chance to support their own
friends. Our Government has supported them long enough, while their friends have been fighting against
us. Here they have been issuing rations to over two hundred and fifty citizens. They did not like to leave
their homes, but they had to, and make the best of it.

There have been about one hundred and thirty negroes enlisted in this place and gong to Hilton Head to
join a negro regiment there. I am glad that the Government has consented to enlist the negroes; they are
able and willing to be of great service to us. Why not let them help us fight our battles? I am sure that a
regiment composed of such smart, rugged fellows as left here would fight almost, if not quite equal to the
Yankees. Their whole soul is in it.

"That barbarous institution, slavery will soon be blotted out of our beloved country forever, and that
glorious old flag the stars and stripes will soon, I trust, float without a spot or a stain, over the length and
breadth of our land, proclaiming freedom to all; and it makes me feel proud that I can lend my feeble
energies to help wash out that stain.

"One can see the effects of slavery here in St. Augustine very plain.  Everything is more than fifty years
behind the times. There are but a very few wagons here., The ladies ride mostly in an old horse-cart or on
horseback; they cook mostly by fireplaces, grind their corn with a hand-mill something like our coffee-mills,
turned by a negro. Draw their water out of the well with a pole, hand-over-hand. The people have no
enterprise. Oranges are here natural fruit, but so sour that one can hardly eat them; when if they would
take a little pains and bud them, they might have sweet and nice fruit to almost any extent.

"The roads, fences, bridges, and every thing is out of repair, and although this is the oldest settled plaoe
in the Union, There has, never been a free school in the place, until a few days ago, when our folks started
one to educate the negroes." It would have done any one good to have seen their faces brighten up when
we told them that we were going to start school for the purpose of educating them. . There is nothing more
of importance to write. We are living very well now for soldiers."

Affairs at Pocataligo (Savannah Republican, April 29, 1863)
The usual monotony of our quiet little village was disturbed yesterday the arrival, by flag of truce boat at
Port Royal Ferry, of a Mr. Mathias Leonardy and his family, consisting of several young ladies and two or
three boys. They are refugees from St. Augustine, Florida, or rather they were ordered from that old town
by that dogged Yankee Colonel in command there, simply for the reason that they had a relative in the
“Rebel” army. Jacksonville was the first place they landed at after leaving Augustine, where they remained
about a month---witnessing that brilliant engagement between the darkies and our boys. From the
appearance of the family, they have undoubtedly witnessed more lucrative days—but such is war—those
people, who were used to opulence, and ease at home, are now being tossed “from pillow to post”,
receiving but few acts of kindness as they pass from place to place, in search of a “haven of rest.”….

                               7th Conn Infantry
7th Conn Volunteers
May 7 the 7th New Hampshire was replaced by the 7th Conn. Volunteers with Col Joseph R. Hawley in
command. They would remain in St. Augustine until August 2nd. The regiment thought that their principal
duty was to regulate and feed the St. Augustine population. Col. Hawley promptly rounded up 150 head of
cattle belonging to Daniel Futch. He would later be General Hawley. His wife Harriet Foote Hawley served
as a nurse and teacher and visited St. Augustine. Her sister (Katherine Foote) was also a teacher at St.
Augustine.

The principal duty at St. Augustine was to regulate and feed the resident population, numbering about 700
whites and 300 colored. A foraging party sent out by Colonel Hawley brought in 150 head of cattle
captured from a Confederate contractor named Daniel Futch. One hundred men were required for guard
duty. (Regimental History)

We learn that the following are among those who have arrived in this city:  The three Misses Buffington
and brother, Mrs. Putnam, Mrs. Smith, Mr. Panotty, wife and daughter.  Also, the mother of Gen. Kirby
Smith, who is seventy-six years of age.  Mr. Quincy, an old gentleman of eighty years of age, with his wife,
two daughters and two sons, took the train for Charleston.
 Mr. Buffington was detained as a prisoner at
Hilton Head. . . .
MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

More on Mrs. Smith
Letter from Headquarters 1863
From Lt Col Asst. Adjutant Gen'l to 10 Army Corps of Dept South
written to Mrs. Frances Webster
Mrs. Francis M. Webster
Geneva, Ontario County, NY

Madam: I am instructed by the Major General Commanding Dept. to acknowledge the receipt of your note
dated 9th inst. relative to the case of your mother, Mrs. Josie Smith, of St. Augustine Fla; and in reply to
acquaint you:

That there was not the slightest disposition on the part of the Officer Commanding St. Augustine to molest
or deport any of the peaceful, or non-combatant, residents of that place; until it was found, that, by the
abuse of your injudicious license of speech, defamatory of the government, serious difficulties were likely
to arise among the more ignorant and turbulent of the population; and until it had also been found, that
communication with the enemy, of a nature prejudicial to the public interests, was being kept up from within
the lines of St. Augustine. In this illegitimate correspondence it was found that Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Putnam and
others were involved, and the order for them to quit the lines & to live amongst those with who they
sympathized was thereupon issued.

Nevertheless, as a mark of respect, the only one he was at present with power of paying, to the
memory of your late gallant husband., Lt. Col. Webster, and also in deference to the memories of the
gallant Kirby Smith, who fell in Mexico, and that other Kirby Smith who more recently fell at Corinth, I am
instructed by the Major General Commanding to announce to you that Mrs. Smith will not be molested, nor
deported, and to issue orders accordingly to the Commanding Officer at St. Augustine.

* * *

SAVANNAH [GA] REPUBLICAN, June 12, 1863, p. 1, c. 1
More Banished Families - Several families from St. Augustine, Fla., arrived in this city on Wednesday night,
by flag of truce via Hilton Head and Pocotaligo, among them Mrs. Smith, the mother of Gen. Kirby Smith,
Mrs. B. A. Putnam, wife of Judge Putnam, Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Pacetty, and others.

More Banished Families (Savannah Republican, Jun. 12, 1863)
Several families from St. Augustine, Fla., arrived in this city on Wednesday night, by flag of truce via Hilton
Head and Pocotaligo, among them Mrs. Smith, the mother of Gen. Kirby Smith, Mrs. B. A. Putnam, wife of
Judge Putnam, Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Pacetty, and others.

A member of Co. K, 7th Florida Regiment, stationed at Knoxville, Tenn., has collected from the citizens and
soldiery in and about Knoxville, some two hundred and twenty-five dollars in aid of the women and children
who were banished by the Abolitionists from their homes in St. Augustine. The money will be duly
forwarded to the sufferers at Lake City.

Provost Marshall Administers Oath of Allegiance
Office of the Provost Marshall
St Augustine Fla June 14th 1863

Colonel
I have just finished administering the Oath of Allegiance and the issuing of Descriptive Passes to the
inhabitants at this Post, with the following exceptions. To a few persons who are invalids and upon whom I
shall call during the present week and to the Rev Edward Aubriel, Rev Bernard Aubance and Rev F Katrio
Kerby, priest officiating at the Cathedral of St Augustine in this City, and also to Mary Aloysious, Mary
Evangelista, Mary Magdalenia and Mary Monica, sisters of Mercy at the Convent of St Mary in this City and
to the Misses Luzzie and Ellen Hennery boarders at the said Covenant. The above named persons have
expressed a desire to me to take the Oath of Neutrality and I am now waiting for instructions from you as to
the course I shall pursue with them. Your order in relation to the "Examination of Passes" is received and
before executing it, I would ask whether it is necessary at this Post, in as much as I have just issued the
Passes, and know that there can be no reason of taking the Oath by anyone at this Post. Four orders
concerning those "Desiring to escape the Draft" and the "Sale of Wines, Liquors and Ales" are received
and will be immediately obeyed. I send to you by this Steamer five men named Richard Parker, William
Loach, William Barrow, John Barrow, and Jackson Knowles. Richard Parker and William Louch were
conscripted by the Confederate authorities fled, and arrived at this post June 3rd 1863. John Barrow,
William Barrow and Jackson Knowles were privates in Capt Oakes Co Con Inf, deserters and arrived at this
post June 13th 1863. I also send you the Registry of Descriptive Passes issued and of Oaths administered
at this Post to June 14, 1863. I also send you a letter addressed to Andrew Floyd, prisoner at Hilton Head,
containing eight dollars, one addressed to Bartolo Genovar prisoner at Hilton Head containing two dollars
and one addressed to William Gardiner prisoner at Hilton Head containing two dollars, all of which I have
receipted for, and a box and parcel for Bartolo Genovar. I understood that some furniture sent from here
for Lehr Middleton was seized at Hilton Head and now remains there. I am directed by Col R Hawley Co
what the furniture is old family furniture belonging to a Mrs Cobb, a loyal woman residing at the North, and
has been in the charge of
Mrs Clarissa Anderson, a loyal woman living in this City, at whose request it was
sent North to protect it from any accident that might happen to it here.

Deportations
We have announced before that Gen. Hunter, the Federal commander at Hilton Head, had ordered that all
the citizens of St. Augustine who sympathized with the South, or who had relatives in the Confederate
army, should be banished from that city.  In pursuance of this barbarous order, on Tuesday, the 28th of
May, the Federal steamer
Boston was at the wharf at St. Augustine, prepared to receive the exiles.  Some
thirty or forty citizens, men, women, and children, were embarked on board the steamer, which proceeded
on her voyage, the exiles being uniformed of their destination.  Many supposed that they would be landed
at Fernandina, but, upon their arrival there, they were informed that the order from General Hunter was
peremptory for the steamer to proceed to Hilton Head.  The steamers accordingly arrived at that port.  The
prisoners were not taken on shore, but were kept on board one week.  They were then taken to Beaufort,
and placed in a dwelling there, guarded by Federal troops.  This, we learn, was done to protect them from
the insults of the Federal troops, frequent complaints having been made by political prisoners of the ill
treatment received by them at the hands of the Yankee officers and soldiers.  From Beaufort they were
conveyed in accommodation wagons to the Confederate lines, and by railroad a portion of them arrived in
this city on Wednesday night by the Charleston train.

On their arrival within our lines, they separated in different directions, in search of relatives and friends,
many of them being comparatively destitute, having been robbed of their property and driven from their
homes with scant means.

We learn that the following are among those who have arrived in this city:  The three Misses Buffington
and brother, Mrs. Putnam, Mrs. Smith, Mr. Panotty, wife and daughter.  Also, the mother of Gen. Kirby
Smith, who is seventy-six years of age.  Mr. Quincy, an old gentleman of eighty years of age, with his wife,
two daughters and two sons, took the train for Charleston.  Mr. Buffington was detained as a prisoner at
Hilton Head. . . .
MEMPHIS DAILY APPEAL [ATLANTA, GA], June 15, 1863, p. 2, c. 2

Passes in St. Augustine
Office of the Provost Marshall
St Augustine Fla June 14th 1863

Colonel I have just finished administering the Oath of Allegiance and the issuing of Descriptive Passes to
the inhabitants at this Post, with the following exceptions. To a few persons who are invalids and upon
whom I shall call during the present week and to the Rev Edward Aubriel, Rev Bernard Aubance and Rev F
Katrio Kirby, priest officiating at the Cathedral of St Augustine in this City, and also to Mary Aloysious, Mary
Evangelista, Mary Magdalenia and Mary Monica, sisters of Mercy at the Convent of St Mary in this City and
to the Misses Luzzie and Ellen Hennery boarders at the said Covenant. The above named persons have
expressed a desire to me to take the Oath of Neutrality and I am now waiting for instructions from you as to
the course I shall pursue with them. Your order in relation to the "Examination of Passes" is received and
before executing it, I would ask whether it is necessary at this Post, in as much as I have just issued the
Passes, and know that there can be no reason of taking the Oath by anyone at this Post. Four orders
concerning those "desiring to escape the Draft" and the "Sale of Wines, Liquors and Ales are received and
will be immediately obeyed. I send to you by this Steamer five men named Richard Parker, William Loach,
William Barrow, John Barrow, and Jackson Knowles. Richard Parker and William Louch were conscripted
by the Confederate authorities fled, and arrived at this post June 3rd 1863. John Barrow, William Barrow
and Jackson Knowles were privates in Capt Oakes Co Con Inf, deserters and arrived at this post June 13th
1863. I also send you the Registry of Descriptive Passes issued and of Oaths administered at this Post to
June 14 1863. I also send you a letter addressed to Andrew Floyd, prisoner at Hilton Head, containing
eight dollars, one addressed to Bartolo Genovar prisoner at Hilton Head containing two dollars and one
addressed to William Gardiner prisoner at Hilton Head containing two dollars, all of which I have receipted
for, and a box and parcel for Bartolo Genovar. I understood that some furniture sent from here for Lehr
Middleton was seized at Hilton Head and now remains there. I am directed by Col R Hawley Co what the
furniture is old family furniture belonging to a Mrs. Cobb, a loyal woman residing at the North, and has
been in the charge of Mrs. Clarissa Anderson, a loyal woman living in this City, at whose request it was
sent North to protect it from any accident that might happen to it here

O S Sanford
Capt 7CV Provost Marshall

Lincoln’s Fast Day in New Orleans (Savannah Republican, June 19, 1863)
Father Joubert of St. Augustine’s Church did not read the Proclamation, and he also refuses the
sacrament to colored men in the Union service.

Celebration of the Battle of Bunker Hill (Regimental History)
June 17th was the anniversary of the battle of Bunker Hill which was celebrated by a meeting in a church.
The celebration consisted of speeches by Colonel Hawley and Lieutenants Dempsey and Wildman and
music by the glee club.

Population of St. Augustine (The New South - June 20, 1863)
The
Fernandina Peninsula states, from figures furnished by the Provost Marshal, that St. Augustine has a
population of 706 whites, of whom 297 are males, and 409 females; and 321 colored,---128 males and 193
females, making the total population 1027.

4th of July in St. Augustine
At Fort Marion Kate Foote raises the flag and Harriet Hawley fires the cannon.

The Case of the Montones
HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,
Saint Augustine, Fla., July 7, 1863.
Lieut. Col. E. W. SMITH,
A. A. G., Dept. of the South, Port Royal, S. C.:
COLONEL: I have the honor to report that nothing has occurred since my last dispatch worthy of special
mention.  A little tug called the
Montones, Captain Hayes, came into this port on her way to Montones,
Cuba, and was viewed with great suspicion. Such I find to have been the case at Fortress Monroe,
Beaufort, N. C., and Hilton Head. At the latter place she was thoroughly overhauled. I had detectives at
work, but was unable to get sufficient evidence to warrant me in seizing her. One of the crew, a rampant,
noisy rebel and armed blockade-runner, I arrested and sent by todays boat, the
Collins, to the Head. I
recommend that he be sent to New York. The
Montones would be a most serviceable boat for the rebels in
Indian River, and despite her excellent papers I fear such may be her destination.  There is scarcely a
whisper of disloyalty here, though undoubtedly there may be latent treason. The people seem to be
satisfied with the government of the post, which I endeavor to keep thorough and strict, though kind.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOS. R. HAWLEY,
Colonel Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, Comdg. Post.

10th Conn to Morris Island
Months before the 10th Conn had been split up with several companies participating in the assault on Fort
Wagner. Having heard of another attempt being planned. Colonel Hawley requested that the remaining 6
companies of his regiment would be relieved from garrison duty and ordered into active service. The
request was granted.


                          48th New York Volunteers
48th New York Volunteers
The 48th N Y Volunteers arrived on the 2d of August after its losses on Morris Island. On August 13 1863
the command changed to the 48th New York Volunteers. Five companies were quartered in the barracks
and three were sent to
Fort Marion. Major Dudley Strickland was in command. (First Report).  2nd Lt.
James Nichols was appointed Provost Marshal. Lieutenant Ingraham was in charge of the office of the
commissary.

The contribution of this regiment to the town was the theater with its fixtures brought from Fort Pulaski and
their organization called "Barton Dramatic Association."

Lieutenant James M. Nichols became the provost marshal at St. Augustine. "As provost-marshal, I had the
complete supervision of the city, the receiving of flags of truce, and the regulation and examination of the
correspondence between the inhabitants and their friends within the Confederate lines. All nre-arms had
been taken from the citizens by my predecessor; but the owners were permitted to use them occasionally
for hunting, under certain restrictions. People were allowed to come in and go out of the city, when it was
apparent that no harm could result, and the planters outside were encouraged to bring in produce and
other supplies under the scrutiny of men detailed for the purpose." (From
Perry's Saints) The regiment
would get a two months rest in St. Augustine.



$100 Reward (Savannah Republican, Sept 15, 1863)
Ranaway from the undersigned, on Saturday night, the 5th inst., a negro man named SOLOMON. He is
about 26 years of age, 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high, strongly built, dark brown complexion; looks down and
answers slowly when spoken to. --- He belongs to Mr. V. Sanchez, formerly of St. Augustine Fla.
Aug 12 H. F. Willink, Jr.

Living in St. Augustine (Perry's Saints)
"Among those whom I recall of the good people who resided there were
Mrs. Anderson and her son, the
doctor, whose delightful home in the suburbs, in its surroundings and furnishing, but more especially in its
charming atmosphere of culture and refinement, so often helped us to throw off the hardening and
brutalizing effects of army life and associations. The Misses Mather and Perritt, with whom a number of our
officers boarded, natives of the North, driven to this softer climate by delicate health, were in the fullest
sympathy and accord with us, and were not only exceedingly kind, but afforded much assistance, by
reason of their familiar acquaintance with t,he city, its affairs, and its people
.. ..Occasionally, the pickets
were fired upon, but no regular attack was made. Communication was undoubtedly kept up between the
citizens and the enemy, outside the city, in spite of the great precautions taken to prevent it. Applicants for
admission to the city were reported waiting at the picket stations almost daily, some of whom were received
and others turned away. Visitors came to the city by almost every steamer, and the abundant leisure of
most of the officers allowed of their generous entertainment."

To the Editor of the Brooklyn City News:
ST. AUGUSTINE, Florida,
August 4th, 1863.
My Dear Sir—The Brooklyn 48th have landed here, and six companies of the 7th Connecticut, leave here
to-day for Morris Island. We expect to stay in the ancient city for a time—all quiet and healthy here—
everything delightful. Enclosed is a copy of the
New South. I am just off guard and the steamer Boston
leaves with the mail in half an hour. Send my papers here, they are a treat worth having, especially now
that the rebellion is getting drunk.
Yours truly, WILL WATKINS.

We extract the following paragraph from the copy of the New South forwarded by our correspondent:
THE 48TH NEW YORK.—A detachment from this regiment, now greatly reduced by the casualties in their
brave and determined charge on Fort Wagner, was one day, while we were constructing our works at the
front on Morris Island, detailed to draw some mortar down to them, under Gen. Seymour's direction. The
latter addressed them "now men, we have got the enemy pretty well cowed—let us show them we are not
afraid of them; we will mount these mortars right before their eyes." The boys gave a shout and dragged
the mortars, one after another to their positions where they were mounted in plain view of the enemy. They
were of course vigorously shelled, but had only one man wounded. After the work was done, Gen.
Seymour had the men formed, in line and spoke to them as follows: "My brave men, you have done well;
this is the first time I have ever seen heavy mortars mounted directly under a hot fire from our enemy's fort,
in broad daylight, and I give you the praise due for your coolness and bravery." Gen. Seymour has the
reputation of being "hard" on Volunteers, but we are convinced that where they come up to the proper
standard of discipline and bravery, he will never do them injustice. Capt. Wm. B. Coan, of Co. E, who had
his coat torn by a grape shot, in the late fight, is now in command of the 48th.

Rebels About How the Freedman Live (Commercial Advertiser). August 21, 1863
ST. AUGUSTINE, Florida, August 21.
The 48th regiment New York volunteers, under command of Major D. W. Strickland, is now well established
at this post and in good working order. As many of its members were severely wounded, or killed, at the
assault on Fort Wagner, the force here is not large. The soldiers, however, are of that class who, when
danger threatens, are undismayed, and hence, especially as no particular cause for alarm exists at
present, we feel that the force at this point is all that is needed.

Some restlessness is manifest outside of our lines. On Saturday night, 15th inst., a boat load of rebels was
discovered to be inside of one of the picket posts, evidently intent on the capture of the post. The design
was fortunately frustrated. For a night or two following alarms were given, but for these there was no good
foundation.

A native of this city came in a day or two after, and reported that Captain Dickinson was outside with two
hundred cavalry. They were in the same locality all of the last Spring. When Jacksonville was taken in April
last, Capt. D. with his band crossed the St. John's river, and with the exception of small scouting parties,
has not till now returned. He will doubtless find it to be the part of wisdom to remain outside.
The man who brought in the above news went to St. John's Bluffs, with the permission of the authorities
here, to visit friends. The rebels regard him as an obnoxious person, and on hearing of his presence in
those parts they attempted to entrap him. He, however, escaped their toils, and by taking the woods he
made his way to town.

The condition of the negroes is about as it has been. They are now gathering the fruit of their Spring and
Summer toil. The quantity is not large, but as, on account of the great demand for vegetables the prices
received are high, they have made a pretty good thing of it. The ordinary price of peas has been fifty cents
a peck, potatoes fifty cents a peck; small watermelons, forty and fifty cents, &c. It is now time to prepare
their gardens for Fall and Winter crops. For this purpose seeds are much needed. We hope to receive a
supply from friends at the North. It is said that crops cannot be procured from seeds raised here. The
explanation of this phenomenon is to be found in the poverty of the soil occasioned by the neglect to
manure and otherwise enrich it. It is to be regretted that much of the toil of this industrious class of citizens
is unrequited. The frequent and sudden change of regiments, often between the visits of the paymaster,
prevents the soldiers from paying their washbills, and thus the earnings of weeks, as well as the little stock
of starch and soap, are swept away. The women, in this way, lose from three to thirty dollars each. An
industrious shoemaker informs me that by these changes he has lost more than one hundred dollars. I am
ashamed to state that in some cases our soldiers do not pay when they have the money. This is the
exception not the rule.

Language is inadequate to express the horror which fills our minds as we read of the late riots in the
metropolis of our land. We would not have believed it possible that men could become so much like fiends
incarnate as to invade the sanctuary of innocence and ruthlessly trample upon the rights of persons who
were peaceably plying their own avocations and yielding obedience to just and righteous laws.
A steamer has arrived to-day, but she brings no letters or papers from North of Port Royal. The old story is
repeated, "As we were going out of Port Royal harbor the
Arago with mail from New York was going in." We
must wait now a fortnight or more. Our latest dates were of August 8th.   I. W. B.

Recreation
In games with picked nines from other regiments it generally won the laurels. In a game with the nine of the
Forty-seventh New York, played at Fort Pulaski, January 3, 1863, it won by a score of twenty to seven. But
the great source of amusement was the theatre. It may be doubted if anything (in that line) was as fine in
the war as the three theatres which were erected respectively at Fort Pulaski, Ga., at St. Augustine, Fla.,
and at Hilton Head, S. C., by the Forty-eighth Regiment, where entertainments of a not unpretentious class
were given by the actors and actresses of the " Barton Dramatic Association." It so happened that there
were in the Forty-eighth several professional actors, and especially one scenic artist. Major Barrett,
who was its president, has furnished from memory a list of the members of the Association, and a sketch of
its career :
James A. Barrett, President.
Robert Dixon, Stage Manager and Tragedy.
James White, Heavy Tragedy.
C. L. Harrison, Scenic Artist and Costumer.
A. J. DeHaven, Property Man and Comedian.
William H. Owen, James Barnes, Joseph Murphy, John Dupree,
Comedy and Song.
E. J. Barney, Thomas B. Wood, James S. Wyckoff, J. L. Michaels,
Walking Gentlemen.
Lewis W. Burr, Abraham J. Palmer, Leading Ladies.
Vitruvious Witcomb, Old Lady.
N. W. Pease, John Stewart, Chambermaids.
The Regimental Band, Orchestra.

The leader of the band at St. Augustine was George F. Miller and among its members: Doering, Fitch,
Weed, GofT, Stewart, Jones, J. A. and A. B. Dupree, Ivans, Shannon, Sweeney, Thompson, Monell,
Whitcomb, and " Frenchy." They called themselves "the big blowers."

St. Augustine wasn't all play and rehab. Sgt. Gotlieb Hamel 18 was wounded by the accidental explosion of
a shell.

Order for St. Augustine Hospital Given (New York Herald) August 19, 1863
General Orders - No 91. Department of the South Headquarters in the Field,
Folly Island, S. C., Oct. 19, 1863
On the recommendation of the Medical Director, a convalescent camp or barracks will be established at St.
Augustine, Florida, where hereafter all sick and convalescent officers and soldiers, requiring a change of
climate "to save life or prevent permanent disability," will be sent.

The Medical Director will assign a suitable medical officer to the charge of the convalescent barracks, who
will proceed without delay to St. Augustine, and under the direction of the Post Commander will select a
suitable building for the purpose, and make such requisitions for bedding, furniture, medical stores, &c, as
may be required for two hundred men. A portion of the barracks will be set aside for officers, the remainder
for enlisted men. Details for attendants will be made, on application of the surgeon in charge, by the Post
Commander.....
Major General Q. A. Gillmore
W Gillmore Burger, Assistant Adjutant General

$100 Reward (Savannah Republican, Sept 15, 1863)
Ranaway from the undersigned, on Saturday night, the 5th inst., a negro man named SOLOMON. He is
about 26 years of age, 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high, strongly built, dark brown complexion; looks down and
answers slowly when spoken to. --- He belongs to Mr. V. Sanchez, formerly of St. Augustine Fla.
Aug 12 H. F. Willink, Jr.

Dr Seth Rogers and the Purpose of the New Hospital (Dr. Seth Rogers, Letters)
Dr. Seth Rogers was the surgeon for the
33rd USCT. He gave this analysis: "It is a pretty severe official
joke that General Gillmore is just now playing off on those who have obtained surgeon's certificates stating
that change of climate is necessary "to prevent permanent disability" or to save life." Since the 19th ins't all
such have been sent to Convalescent Camp at St. Augustine, Fla. instead of North. The almost
impossibility of getting out of the Department in any other way than on a surgeon's certificate has led to
abuses that are best remedied by this change of programme. It seems hard that those who really need to
go North should have to suffer for the exaggerated complaints of the unworthy. Capt Rogers (33 USCT)
has been sick in hospital nearly a month and Surgeon Hayden has sent a certificate to Headquarters
before my return. Yesterday I saw him off to St. Augustine. Fortunately he is convalescent and can meet
the disappointment better than he could two weeks ago.

Condition of the Townspeople (Brooklyn City News, undated)
The condition of the negroes is about as it has been. They are now gathering the fruit of their Spring and
Summer toil. The quantity is not large, but as, on account of the great demand for vegetables the prices
received are high, they have made a pretty good thing of it. The ordinary price of peas has been fifty cents
a peck, potatoes fifty cents a peck; small watermelons, forty and fifty cents, etc. It is now time to prepare
their gardens for Fall and Winter crops. For this purpose seeds are much needed. We hope to receive a
supply from friends at the North. It is said that crops cannot be procured from seeds raised here. The
explanation of this phenomenon is to be found in the poverty of the soil, occasioned by the neglect to
manure and otherwise enrich it. It is to be regretted that much of the toil of this industrious class of citizens
is unrequited. The frequent and sudden change of regiments, often between the visits of the paymaster,
prevents the soldiers from paying their wash bills, and thus the earnings of weeks, as well as the little stock
of starch and soap, are swept away. The women, in this way, lose from three to thirty dollars each. An
industrious shoemaker informs me that by these changes he has lost more than one hundred dollars. I am
ashamed to state that in some cases our soldiers do not pay when, they have the money. This is the
exception not the rule.

                           
     24 Massachusetts
Twenty-fourth Massachusetts Replace the 46th New York
On October 1 a skirmish took place with Confederate forces. October 4, 1863 The Twenty-fourth who had
also come from Morris Island replaced the 46th New York.

Special Orders Hdqrs Dept of the South No 546
In the Field Folly Island S C Sept 28 1863 IX Col FA Osborn Twenty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers will
proceed with his regiment to Saint Augustine and assume command of that post.

Lincoln's Plan for Reconstruction
In December of 1863 Abraham Lincoln issues his Proclamation for Amnesty and Reconstruction. A Union
Meeting was held in St. Augustine on December 19, 1863.
Tax Commissioner Stickney called the meeting
to order and
Judge David R. Dunham was elected chairman (surprisingly he did not mention this role in his
request for a pardon from Andrew Johnson - however he listed that he was at the wharf to greet the
Commander Rogers). Bartarlo Oliveros attended the meeting along with Samuel Walker, William Alsop,
Calvin Robinson and G. N. Papy (as secretary of the meeting). Resolutions were passed for the abolition
of slavery and in favor of a Florida Constitutional Convention to be held in March 1864. This group would
have an executive committee that would continue meeting and later chose Stickney, Plants and Philip
Frazier were chosen as delegates. They were not accepted by the Republican Unionists Convention. The
Convention instead chose a member of
Buckingham Smith's group. The President's plan for the
restoration of Florida will be a failure, and that is now the opinion of his secretary Mr. Hay. We discussed
the subject yesterday and the conclusion arrived at was, that Mr. Hay would make an effort to enroll one
tenth of the voters in 1860. In case of failure, which he thought certain, he would go back to the President
and ask a change of program like that with which I started. Major Hays was authorized to administer the
oaths.

                            
10th Connecticut Volunteers
Camp of the 10th Connecticut Volunteers
During the last of October the 10th Connecticut would move to St. Augustine. The camp was made outside
the city gates. New tents were issued floors and bunks were built and some had chimneys of cochina.
Chaplin Trumbull who had been held prisoner from being captured tending to the wounded at Fort Wagner
was returned to the unit. Captain J. S. Engles was Provost Marshal, Lieut Benjamin Wright, post-adjutant,
Lieut. Sanford B. Palmer, post-quartermaster. Lieut-Col Leggett commanded the regiment.

Attack on the Wood Cutters
On December 30 another attack was made on the wood gathers from St. Augustine by Captain Dickison
CSA. The attack would involve members of the 10th Connecticut and 24th Mass Volunteers (the
commander of the 24th Mass was Major Charles H. Hooper). Lieut Walker of the 24th Mass was killed in
the attack (seemingly accidentally by Union troops as reported by the
New South Newspaper). Private
William Burns of the 10th Conn was also killed. Captain Dickison was commended by the Union for the care
he took of Lieut Walker as he used his saddlebags as a pillow and covered Lieut. Walker with his horse
blanket. One soldier was instantly killed and 24 were captured. Twenty-two of these were from the 10th
Connecticut.

                                         
1864                             
First Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation
"It was the first anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation or of its application, and the colored
population made the most of it; nor was the celebration confined to them, since the regimental bands
played the old year out and the new one in. A stage or platform had been erected on the plaza for the
speakers and, at 11 a.m., the colored people, several hundred in number, came marching up to the stage
by twos, old and young, and of both sexes. Union officers and men were also present and, first in order,
was the reading of the famous proclamation; the bands played, Judge Stickney presided, Chaplains
Trumbull and Willson spoke, and the colored preachers told the people what was expected of them. The
negro children sang songs, such as "John Brown's Body," " The Year of Jubilee,'' etc. Then came an
invitation for the officers of both regiments, the two bands, and other people to partake of a collation
prepared in the Court House Hall. The two bands united in playing Hail Columbia, and then all started for
the building. The negroes formed on the plaza, while the officers and musicians devoured the food within
the hall. The soldiers standing around had infinite amusement in hearing the colored folks sing their own
peculiar melodies. After the bands had filled up with food, they came out and again tuned their
instruments, giving many national airs, ending with "Yankee Doodle." Later came amusements of their own
in the several quarters of the companies. Gander or stag-dances were the order of the evening, and if the
music was primitive, the "light fantastic" was energetic, and the fun ran merrily on till a late hour, and well it
was that it should, for as yet these men realize nothing of the exactions of the approaching Battle Summer
and, ere the year is ended, many a brave boy in blue who on this New Year's night is so blithe and gay, will
sleep beneath the soil of Old Virginy, an offering for his country's need." An eyewitness account from the
24th Mass Volunteers.

from the Diary of Lieutenant James H. Linsley, 10th Conn: "Anniversary of Presidents proclamation of
Freedom celebrated by Freedmen of Florida. Addresses on the Plaza by Anti-Slavery men of New England
to the negroes of this slave ridden state of Florida. Music by the colored schools who came out in
procession in gala dress. Winding up with fine collation provided by the colored people, to which the army
officers of both regiments and the hospital and others were invited."

Chaplain Trumbull recalled "One old 'Uncle Tom,' white-haired, smiling-faced, and tearful-eyed, after
passing from group to group of the merry throng, with a fuller appreciation of the import of the whole affair
in contrast with his past, and in earnest of the future of his long'enslaved and now emancipated people,
said to me, out of the depths of his briming heart: 'I jus'tank de Lord I eber libed to 'member dis day. Bress
de Lord! Bress de Lord!"

Joseph Remington appointed U. S. Marshal
Joseph Remington was appointed as U. S. District Marshal (March 31, 1863) and confirmed by the Senate
on January 20, 1864. Although still under marshal law this was one more sign of the returning civil liberties
to the people of St. Augustine.

Headquarters, Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C., Jan. 31, 1864
General Orders No. 16
.
In accordance with the provisions of the Presidential Proclamation of Pardon and Amnesty, given at
Washington on the 8th day of December, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty-
three, and in pursuance of instructions received from the President of the United States, Major John Hay,
Assistant Adjutant general, will proceed to Fernandina, Florida, and other convenient points in that State,
for the purpose of extending to the citizens of the State of Florida an opportunity to avail themselves of the
benefits of that Proclamation, by offering for their signature, the oath of allegiance therein proscribed, and
by issuing to all those subscribing to said oath, certificates entitling them to the benefits of the
Proclamation.

Fugitive citizens of the State of Florida, within the limits of this Department, will have an opportunity to
subscribe to the same oath and secure certificates, in the office of the Post Commander at Hilton Head,
South Carolina.
By Command of Maj. Genl Q.A. Gillmore
Ed. W. Smith, Asst. Adjt. General
Feb 20, 1864

Who were these freed slaves?
Rev. Greely's Sunday School Class:

These persons are from 20 to 75 years of age, and almost of all the shades from the pure imported African
to the complexions so light that you would never suspect their relation to the race.

About a dozen of these are considerably advanced in life, and owing to the [..?..] of their comprehension
and lacking the power of retention, the labor for the first few weeks seemed to produce the only effect of
the answering echo to the voice, but presently the faculties began to awake, the seed sown to germinate
and now they feel proud to be able to read and spell in monosyllables of three and four letters. One over
70 yrs of age who was stolen from Africa since her [..?..] can do better than this. The great eagerness of
these to learn to read the Bible, prompts them to such diligence and perseverance that I have no doubt
they will soon succeed if they can get the large print Testaments; can you furnish them? If so, direct to
Rev. [..?..]  Richards at Beaufort S. C., and he will convey them to this place.  Is it strange that these
elderly people are [..?..] to learn when the very life-elements of those faculties which God had given them
have been so nearly crushed out by the [..?..] of their task-masters.

But they can learn and will learn to read the word of God, which is a more precious idea to them than the
possession of silver or gold. You can't imagine what a beam of Joy passed over their countenances
yesterday morning in Sabbath School, when I told them they should have a New Testament of large print
when they got able to read it.

The younger members of the school are making very good progress, and some learn very rapidly; but I
cannot perceive that color makes any difference in their capacities.

...This laborious, and inconvenient arrangement is necessary to accommodate the pupils of different ages
and employment. Many have impaired eyesight. Others are out at days work, and by the week, and can
only attend in the evening. The mother will come in the day and the daughter in the evening when there is
a family and work to attend to at home, &c., &c. and there is no other way to teach this large class of
individuals, only by this irregular and inconvenient way, but so long as we see order coming out of chaos
we will be patient, cheerful, and happy, looking on the bright side

Fundraising for a Chapel Tent for the Tenth (Hartford Daily Courant Feb 2, 1864)
We believe a chapel tent costs about four hundred dollars:

St. Augustine, Fla., Jan. 23, 1864
Mr. Editor - The soldiers of the veteran Tenth need a new chapel tent. They had one which -- like many of
their own old comrades--was long since worn out in hard service. It was a comfort to them while it lasted, as
a gathering place for Sabbath services and evening prayer-meetings, and as their library and reading-
room. They want another just like it. Will not some of my generous fellow-citizens provide funds for the
purpose? If so, let them hand their contributions to A. G. Hammond, Esq., at the Exchange Bank, and thus
do something more for the brave men who are doing so much for them.
Respectfully yours,
H. Clay Trumbull, Chaplain 10th C. V.

Troops move to Picolata
Jacksonville, Fla., February 12, 1864
Colonel Osborn,
24th Mass. Infy., comdg. at St. Augustine FL:

Colonel: You will move at once with your entire command except two good companies, under a good
commander, to garrison Fort Marion and the post temporarily at Picolata. Leave a field office in command if
practicable. You will take three or four days of cooked rations and 80 rounds of ammunition per man,
leaving your camp equipage and heavy baggage behind to follow. The veteran volunteers are not to be
taken, but are to go to Hilton Head, as already ordered. No females are to accompany the command or
follow it. They should be sent North. Your post commissary is to accompany you. The garrison of Fort
Marion are to remain in the fort nights, with the gates closed.

Q. A. Gillmore,
Major-General, Commanding
(War of the Rebellion)

Arrival of Rev. Reynolds
19 Feb 1864
Rev Mr. Reynolds arrived yesterday; he is trying to get the Post Chaplain job. Miss Sarah Mather gives
Rev Reynolds a room and his breakfast and tea.

Withdraw from Picolata
Headquarters U. S. Forces,
St. Augustine, Fla., February 22, 1864
Brig. Gen. J. W. Turner, Chief of Staff:

General: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Communication dated,
Fernandina, Fla.,
February 21, 1864 at 6 o'clock last evening. Teams were immediately dispatched for the baggage of the
two companies stationed at
Picolata, and all arrived here safe this morning.

I have now at this post about 180 men for duty, including 16 musicians, 50 recruits, who have never been
initiated into the mysteries of handling a musket, and 30 men, detailed for duty in the different staff
departments. The force at my command is entirely inadequate to furnish a proper picket and provost guard
in case of actual danger from outside, but if any difficulty occurs, I shall do everything possible with the
means at my disposal, which I trust will prove sufficient for any emergency that is likely to occur. Of that
however, you are much better able to judge than I am.

J. L. Otis
Colonel Tenth Regiment Conn. Vols., Comdg. Post.

ex-Senator Yulee (Harford Daily Curant 2/24/1864)
The house of ex-Senator Yulee, at St. Augustine, Florida, is now the headquarters of the federal
commandant of that port. A letter says: "Yulee has never held office under the confederate government,
not in the State government of Florida since she seceded, and therefore, being included in President
Lincoln's amnesty proclamation, he is laying his plans to be one of those who assist in bringing the State
back into the Union, so as to be "right side up."  [Editor's note: I think that this house should have been
listed as
Fernandina not St. Augustine.]

A Military Hospital for St. Augustine
T. Seymour Brigadier-General, Commanding
Headquarters District of Florida
February 25, 1864

Report of Surg. Adolph Major, U. S. Army
Office Chief Medical Officer Dist. of Florida
...
It is, perhaps, not out of place to recommend that no general hospitals, above those already existing be
established, and especially that the general hospital at Jacksonville may merely be conducted as a
receiving depot, whence to forward to the above hospitals, adding thereto Saint Augustine, Fla. The
remoteness from the main depot of supplies of the department, with all its annoying and delaying
circumstances, and the readiness with which the returning empty transports can be employed for
transportation of sick and wounded, prompts me to come to this conclusion; and while the interior of
Florida, in regard to healthfulness among a large command is yet to be tested, there presents itself at the
convalescent hospital at Saint Augustine a hospital arrangement which, when completed will meet all
demands of sanitary law, with no heavy expenses. Should the army of occupation advance toward Middle
Florida there will be an easy and quick communications with the delightful seaside of the old Spanish
colony.
Adolph Majer,
Surg., U. S. Vols, Chief Medical Officer, Dist. of Fla.
Official

An article in the
Hartford Daily Courant already listed this hospital in Dec 5, 1863. "The 10th Regiment has
a force of 635, of whom 349 are on duty; 181 are on the sick list, of whom 54 are absent from the
regiment. Eight of the officers of this regiment are on the sick list. A convalescent camp has recently been
established at St. Augustine under command of Surgeon Myers and a few of the sick from Connecticut
regiments have been sent there. It is one of the healthiest localities on the Southern coast."

Religious Services
Chaplain Trumbull said that "Protestant residents were glad to attend the army chaplain's services, if they
attended any. The convalescent camp of the
Department of the South, then at St. Augustine, furnished a
large contingent of officers, in addition to the regiments on duty there. There was, therefore, quite a
congregation and quite a pastoral field for the single army chaplain on duty there at that time.

We held regular services, at one time in the
Presbyterian Church, and at another time in the Episcopal
Church. I conducted a service with preaching in the forenoon; a Sunday-school in the afternoon, a prayer-
meeting in the evening, on Sundays; and on Wednesday evening we had mid-week prayer-meetings. This
was in addition to special services in the hospitals, in the military barracks, and in the meeting-places of
the colored people."

Services were also held in the old Catholic chapel of Fort Marion.

The Silent Comforter
Chaplain Trumbull also brought with him a book called the Silent Comforter. It was a collection of Bible texts
in the form of a wall roll for display in a hospital or a sick room. The text were in large type and turned day
at a time. A copy was suspended in the chapel-tent, his tent and in St. Augustine also in the military guard
house of the provost-marshal at the old government quarters.

Structure of the Government in 1864
Rev. T. W. Lewis, by Government authority, has taken possession of the Methodist Church edifice in
behalf of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev Brinkerhoff was the Superintendent of Contrabands (from
February 1863) and a  Baptist Preacher. The services he conducted at the Methodist church were
nondenominational. Greely was able to take over the Methodist building and Brinkerhoff moved to the
Presbyterian Church. Greely also preached one Sunday a month in the
Episcopal church.  The soldiers of
17th Conn regiment were without a chaplain. (An agent of the Christian Commission would take over the
roll of chaplain by 1865.) Another minister Rev. Greely moved from the African Methodist Church to the
American Missionary Association.

Capture of the Navy Tug Columbine. (May 28, 1864)
By the arrival of the steamer
Charles Houghton from Jacksonville this morning, intelligence reaches me of
the capture by the rebels of the armed navy tugboat
Columbine up the St. John's River, a few miles
beyond
Palatka. I have made mention in a previous letter of the capture a few days ago of a number of the
Seventeenth Connecticut Regiment who were doing picket duty at
Picolata. In order to recapture the men
of the Seventeenth, also to annoy and damage the rebels up the river, Gen. Gordon ordered the
expedition on which the
Columbine was lost. The Columbine left Jacksonville with forty colored soldiers on
board. She was to proceed to Brown's Landing which is above
Palatka, to take on board fifty others, and
then return to
Picolata, it being the intention to evacuate all the places on the river beyond that point. It is
supposed she had been to Brown's Landing, taken on board the fifty soldiers, and was on her return when
she was captured. All the information in regard to the affair is gathered from three of the Thirty-fifth United
States Colored Troops, who arrived at St. Augustine with the report that they leaped from the
Columbine
when she was fired upon, and made their way overland to that point. They state that the rebels opened
upon her with two guns, one of the shots taking effect in the rudder, thus crippling the vessel, and forcing
her to beach. She was then at the mercy of the enemy. The
Columbine carried two 20-pounder guns, and
was valued at $20,000. As to the report of her capture we must rely wholly upon the statements made by
the three men of the Thirty-fifth Regiment to parties who came to Hilton Head in the
Charles Houghton.
In passing up the St. John's, above Palatka, a few days ago, the Charles Houghton was fired upon by a
rebel battery on the bank. Eight shots were fired, four of which took effect. One shot went through three
state-rooms and lodged in a pile of knapsacks. No one was injured. Information has been received that the
rebels have another supply of torpedoes ready to place in the
St. John's River below Jacksonville, at about
the same place where the
Harriet A. Weer was destroyed. Unless extra precaution is taken we shall hear of
another torpedo disaster before long. It is about time that this Florida business should be attended to. It
may be all very fine to lose on an average two steamers a month and have nothing to show for it, but it is
any but a paying operation to the Government.



Go to Page 6
Col Francis Osborn
24 Mass Volunteers
St. Augustine Commander in
1863-64
Florida Memory
Col John L Otis
10th Connecticut
Commander in St. Augustine
John Hay
Lincoln's Secretary
This particular copy of this rare public broadside of Lincoln's proclamation was received on February 15, 1864
at Union Army headquarters in St. Augustine, Florida, where Major Hays was authorized to administer the oath
to such persons of that vicinity.
Col. Joseph Hawley
7th Conn
Dept of South Troop Reports

August 30, 1863

December 31, 1863
Gillmore Medals
Company C - Corporal Dennis O'Brien
Company D - Corporal Frederic A.
Felch
Company E - Private John Biderman
Company F - Corporal Henry A. Allen.
Company G - Private Leander
Parmelee
Company H - Private John M. Millikin
Company I - Corporal John J.
Cochran,                        Private Rufus
Aggett
Company K - Privates James A.
Howard,                      Elisha F. Soule
Major Dudley Strickland
48th Flank Marker
U. S. Army Hospital
Florida Memory
Quartermaster Stables 1864
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