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Pensions
Disloyalty - Pensions for United States Volunteer Infantry
First through Sixth Regiments
Joint Resolution of Congress
July 1, 1902

U. S. Statutes
CONSTRUCTION OF ACT JUNE 27, 1890; DISLOYALTY. JOINT RESOLUTION JULY 1, 1902 (32 STAT. L., 750).
Sec. 1. That the Act approved June twenty-seventh, eighteen hundred and ninety, entitled "An Act granting pensions
to soldiers and sailors who are incapacitated for the performance of manual labor, and providing for pensions to
widows, minor children, and dependent parents," is construed and held to include all persons and the widows and
minor children of all deceased persons, subject to the limitations of said act, who served for ninety days in the
military or naval service of the United States during the late war of the rebellion, and who have been honorably
discharged therefrom, and section forty-seven hundred and sixteen, Revised Statutes United States, is amended
accordingly: Provided, however, That the foregoing shall not apply to those who served in the First, Second, Third,
Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Regiments United States Volunteer Infantry who had a prior service in the Confederate army
or navy and who enlisted in said regiments while confined as prisoners of war under a stipulation that they were not
to be pensionable under the laws of the United States,2 nor to those who, having had such prior service, enlisted in
the military or naval service of the United States after the first day of January, eighteen hundred and sixty-five.



* Under date of Feb. 17, 1903, the Commissioner of Pensions issued instructions that claims for pension filed by
persons who served in any of the six regiments above named shall be treated the same as the claims of those
persons who rendered service in other than the excepted regiments, upon the ground that no such stipulation as
named in the resolution, either express or implied, was found of record in the War Department.
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